Friday, October 16, 2015

Slide Images for October 16

 Cakewalk on the Pier
Atlantic City
1902

video
Cakewalk
The American Mutoscope and Biograph Company
1903

Wade in the Water (performed by The Blind Boys of Alabama)
Traditional
First published in 1901


Negroe Dance Hall
Stuart Davis
1913

 Tapdancing Negro
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
1914

 The Souls of Black Folk
W.E.B. Du Bois
1903

 Negro Woman (from “Types of Negroes”
compiled by W.E.B. Du Bois)
Thomas E. Askew
c.1899-1900

 Advertisement for “The Birth of a Nation
Directed by D.W. Griffith
1915

video
Clip from “Birth of a Nation"
D.W. Griffith
1915



 NAACP Protestors Outside a Theater
Showing “Birth of a Nation”
New York
1915

 The Awakening of Ethiopia
Meta Warrick Fuller
c. 1914

 Fredrick Douglass
Isaac Scott Hathaway
1919

 Advertisement for Banania
France
1917

The Soldier
(Used as a book cover illustration)
Edwin A. Harleston
1919

Terms of the Day for October 16

  • Double-consciousness – a term coined by W. E. B. Du Bois used to describe an individual whose identity is divided into several facets. Du Bois saw double consciousness as a useful theoretical model for understanding the psycho-social divisions existing within African American society.
  • Negro Spirituals – religious (generally Christian) songs that were created by enslaved African people in the United States.  Originally an oral tradition that imparted Christian values while also describing the hardships of slavery, this historic group of uniquely American songs is now recognized as a distinct genre of music.
  • The Birth of a Nation –  a 1915 silent drama film directed by D. W. Griffith and based on the novel and play The Clansman, both by Thomas Dixon, Jr.  The film follows the lives of two families through the Civil War, the Reconstruction period, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan.
  • “Love and Theft” –  a term which refers to the tendency of certain cultures to be genuinely fascinated with aspects of another culture to the point of adopting some of that culture’s characteristics, albeit with a misinterpreted understanding of that culture.


Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Slide Images for October 14

 Illustration from Crania Americana
Samuel George Morton
1839

 The White Man’s Burden
Rudyard Kipling
1899

 Invitation to the Pan-African Conference
London
1900

 American Negro Exhibit
Paris, France
1900

 Cover of “Little Black Sambo”
Helen Bannerman
1899

 Illustration from “Little Black Sambo”
Helen Bannerman
1899

 Minstrel Show 
Advertisement Poster
c1900

 Cover of sheet music for “All Coons Look Alike to Me”
Written by Ernest Hogan
1896
Click HERE to listen to the audio.

 The Banjo Lesson
Henry Ossawa Tanner
1893

 The Thankful Poor
Henry Ossawa Tanner
1894

Bible Quilt
Harriet Powers
c. 1895-98

Terms of the Day for October 14

  • Ethnology – the branch of anthropology that compares and analyzes the origins, distribution, technology, religion, language, and social structure of the ethnic, racial, and/or national divisions of humanity.  During Victorian imperialism, this science was used to classify certain ethnicities as “primitive” and “inferior” to whites and in need of white social control.
  • Darky Iconography – a term which refers to overly cartoonish and highly stereotypical depictions of African Americans in the late 19th and into the 20th centuries often used for mass-market items and in literature.


Monday, October 12, 2015

Slide Images for October 12

 Las Castas (The Castes)
Annoymous
Late 18th century



 The Emancipation Memorial
Thomas Ball
1876



 The Spirit of Freedom
Ed Hamilton
1998

 Negro es Bello II
Elizabeth Catlett
1969

 NO MORE O’ THIS SHIT
Rupert Garcia
1969


 Cream of Wheat Advertisements with Rastus
c. 1920s

JamPactJelliTite
Jeff Donaldson
1988

Terms of the Day for October 12


  • Diaspora – meaning “a scattering” and originally used as a term for the dispersal of the Hebrews after the Babylonian occupation, this word has come to refer to historical mass-dispersions of people with common roots, particularly movements of an involuntary nature, such as the African Trans-Atlantic slave trade.
  • Imperialism –  the creation and/or maintenance of an unequal economic, cultural, and territorial relationship between states or cultures, often in the form of an empire, based on domination and subordination.  Also referred to as Colonialism, this term is often specifically applied to the period of western domination during the 19th-20th centuries.